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KS3 Literacy: Writing to Imagine, Explore and Entertain

Price: £45.00
Age Range: KS3

Encourage your students’ imagination and back it up with solid technical know-how with these resources for creative writing. KS3 students develop confidence and flexibility, writing for different purposes in a wide variety of styles.

Language-level lesson starters introduce and reinforce individual grammatical or linguistic elements, and follow-on activities provide easily measurable outcomes for assessment purposes. Resources are designed for Key Stage 3 students.

The six sections are:

  • Basic building blocks
  • Building and sustaining a story
  • Making writing more interesting
  • Genre writing
  • Different writing styles
  • Pre-20th century literature

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Size: 77 Pages
ISBN: 978 1 86025 514 4
Author(s): Gretel Hallett
Code: WIEE
Popularity rank: 154

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Contents List

LESSON PLANS/WORKSHEETS

SECTION ONE: Building blocks of a story

  • 7 MASKS Students explore the meaning of 'masks', in terms of creating characters, looking at imaginative writing on characters and creating an original imaginary character of their own.
  • 9 SCENE SETTING Students create an original scene and explore it thoroughly, using imaginative language, including sensory vocabulary.
  • 11 CONFLICT Students discover the importance of conflict in a successful story. They explore the concept of conflict - from personal to global issues - and create a situation that could constitute a problem for a person or a group of people.

Working with those building blocks

  • 13 PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER Students combine their work on character, scene-setting and conflict, to achieve a first draft story by the end of this lesson.

SECTION TWO: Creating a more complex story

  • 15 ONCE UPON A TIME Students explore the openings of published novels and evaluate the effectiveness of the opening of the story they have written.
  • 17 GETTING COMPLICATED This worksheet has students evaluate their own work and create a second draft of the 'complication' section.
  • 19 THE CRITICAL MOMENT Students evaluate their own work and achieve a second draft of the 'climax' section.
  • 21 HAPPY EVER AFTER Students revise the ending and complete the second draft of their story.
  • 23 MIX 'N' MATCH Students put together all the elements from the 'basic building blocks' lessons and create an imaginative piece of writing.

SECTION THREE: Making the story more interesting

  • 25 CREATIVE USE OF WORDS Students revise adjectives and adverbs and the way they can make creative writing more interesting.
  • 27 START AT THE FINISH Students write a short story that is prompted by an ending.
  • 29 WHAT HAPPENS NEXT? Students analyse different ways to open stories and explore a new way of opening a story of their own.
  • 31 LOVE AND HATE Students explore themes in stories and study one major theme in 'Romeo and Juliet'.

SECTION FOUR: Genre writing

  • 33 GENRE Students research a genre of writing and work with a group to produce a report to the rest of the class.
  • 35 BOLDLY GOING... INTO SCI-FI Students explore how writers use vocabulary and style to establish genre (in this case, sci-fi) and practise writing their own story in the same genre.
  • 37 SURVIVING HORROR FICTION Students explore how writers use vocabulary and style to establish genre (in this case, horror fiction) and practise writing their own story in the same genre.
  • 39 WRITING FOR YOUNG CHILDREN This worksheet has students evaluate the author's craft in generating reading for young children and practise writing in this genre.
  • 41 ELEMENTARY, MY DEARS! Students explore how writers use vocabulary and style to establish genre (in this case, detective fiction) and practise writing their own story in the same genre.
  • 43 QUEST Students explore how writers use vocabulary and style to establish genre (in this case, fantasy fiction) and practise writing their own story in the same genre.

Different formats for stories

  • 45 E-MAILING A STORY This lesson plan has students identify recent language changes, then imagine and create a story told via e-mail.
  • 47 TEXT MESSAGING Students explore how language changes and develops and create an imaginary dialogue in a 'new' form of English.
  • 49 DEAR DIARY Students study extracts from novels written in diary format and learn how to write a diary-form piece of fiction.
  • 51 THAT WAS HIS STORY Students study 'omniscient narrator' texts and experiment with vocabulary and grammar.
  • 53 THIS IS MY STORY Students compare extracts of novels written in the first person and write a short first person autobiographical narrative.

SECTION FIVE: Pre-20th century writing

  • 55 FABLES Students evaluate moral fables and write a modern fable.
  • 57 FOLK LEGENDS Students identify repeating patterns in traditional stories and write an original fairy story.
  • 59 SHIELD-WARRIOR Students identify kennings in a translation of Beowulf and construct their own kennings.
  • 61 MAKING CHANGES Students consider alternative endings for existing stories and generate a new ending for a traditional story.

APPENDICES

  • 62 (1) Creating character (plus writing frame) For use with page 6/7, MASKS.
  • 63 (2) Nouns and adjectives (plus writing frame) For use with page 8/9, SCENE-SETTING.
  • 64 (3) Writing frame For use with page 12/13, PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER.
  • 65 (4) Story openings For use with page 14/15, ONCE UPON A TIME.
  • 66 (5) Building blocks For use with pages 12/13, PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER and 22/23 MIX 'N' MATCH.
  • 67 (6) Adjectives & adverbs For use with page 23/24, CREATIVE USE OF WORDS.
  • 68 (7) Opening lines For use with page 28/29, WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?
  • 69 (8) Extracts from 'Romeo & Juliet' For use with page 30/31, LOVE AND HATE.
  • 70 (9) Horror stories For use with page 36/37, SURVIVING HORROR FICTION.
  • 71 (10) Detective stories For use with page 40/41, ELEMENTARY, MY DEARS!
  • 72 (11) Fantasy fiction extracts For use with page 42/43, QUEST.
  • 73 (12) txtmsg a stry For use with page 46/47, TEXT MESSAGING.
  • 74 (13) Diary extracts For use with page 48/49,DEAR DIARY.
  • 75 (14) Third person narratives For use with page 50/51, THAT WAS HIS STORY.
  • 76 (15) First person narratives For use with page 52/53, THIS IS MY STORY.
  • 77 (16) Extract from Beowulf For use with page 58/59, SHIELD-WARRIOR.